Go Green
 

 
 

Follow Us On Twitter    Become A Fan On Facebook    Visit Our Instagram Page   Network With Us on LinkedIn    Subscribe To Our News Alerts


Go Green Pledge

Download Go Green Widget

Download Go Green News Ticker


Hosted on Green Server Hosted on Green Server
Go Green An Ekotribe Initiative

Green Stories
Change text size:
World Ozone Day - 16 September 2012
Send  your comments Send your comments Green Stories

World Ozone Day - 16 September 2012

Sponsored Sites
Shop Online for
Eco-Friendly Products
Cyber Gear

On 16 September 1987, twenty four Parties signed the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

In 1998, in recognition of the Protocol's unique accomplishments, the General Asembly in its Resolution 49/114 named 16 September as the International day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer. Since that time, the Parties have used this day to celebrate the signing of the Montreal Protocol, and the significant environmental and health benefits that this amazing treaty has yielded.

The Montreal Protocol is celebrating its 25th Anniversary this year.


Q. What is ozone and where is it in the atmosphere?
Ozone is a gas that is naturally present in our atmosphere. Each ozone molecule contains three atoms of oxygen and is denoted chemically as O3. Ozone is found primarily in two regions of the atmosphere. About 10% of atmospheric ozone is in the troposphere, the region closest to Earth (from the surface to about 10–16 kilometers (6–10 miles)). The remaining ozone (about 90%) resides in the stratosphere between the top of the troposphere and about 50 kilometers (31 miles) altitude. The large amount of ozone in the stratosphere is often referred to as the “ozone layer.

Q. How is ozone formed in the atmosphere?
Ozone is formed throughout the atmosphere in multistep chemical processes that require sunlight. In the stratosphere, the process begins with an oxygen molecule (O2) being broken apart by ultraviolet radiation from the Sun. In the lower atmosphere (troposphere), ozone is formed by a different set of chemical reactions that involve naturally occurring gases and those from pollution sources.

Q. Why do we care about atmospheric ozone?
Ozone in the stratosphere absorbs a large part of the Sun’s biologically harmful ultraviolet radiation. Stratospheric ozone is considered “good” ozone because of this beneficial role. In contrast, ozone formed at Earth’s surface in excess of natural amounts is considered “bad” ozone because it is harmful to humans, plants, and animals. Natural ozone near the surface and in the lower atmosphere plays an important beneficial role in chemically removing pollutants from the atmosphere.

Q. How is total ozone distributed over the globe?
The distribution of total ozone over the Earth varies with location on timescales that range from daily to seasonal. The variations are caused by large-scale movements of stratospheric air and the chemical production and destruction of ozone. Total ozone is generally lowest at the equator and highest in polar regions.

Q. How is ozone measured in the atmosphere?
The amount of ozone in the atmosphere is measured by instruments on the ground and carried aloft on balloons, aircraft, and satellites. Some instruments measure ozone locally by continuously drawing air samples into a small detection chamber. Other instruments measure ozone remotely over long distances by using ozone’s unique optical absorption or emission properties.

Q. What are the principal steps in stratospheric ozone depletion caused by human activities?
The initial step in the depletion of stratospheric ozone by human activities is the emission, at Earth’s surface, of gases containing chlorine and bromine. Most of these gases accumulate in the lower atmosphere because they are unreactive and do not dissolve readily in rain or snow. Natural air motions transport these accumulated gases to the stratosphere, where they are converted to more reactive gases. Some of these gases then participate in reactions that destroy ozone. Finally, when air returns to the lower atmosphere, these reactive chlorine and bromine gases are removed from Earth’s atmosphere by rain and snow.

Q. What emissions from human activities lead to ozone depletion?
Certain industrial processes and consumer products result in the emission of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) to the atmosphere. ODSs are manufactured halogen source gases that are controlled worldwide by the Montreal Protocol. These gases bring chlorine and bromine atoms to the stratosphere, where they destroy ozone in chemical reactions. Important examples are the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), once used in almost all refrigeration and air conditioning systems, and the halons, which were used in fire extinguishers. Current ODS abundances in the atmosphere are known directly from air sample measurements.











2
 
 
How To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint?
Click here to request a copy of How To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint?
Green Speak
Click here to request a copy of useful Eco Jargon.
Some non green numbers from Go Green
Click here to request a copy of Non Green Numbers by Go Green.
10 Ways to Go Green
Click here to request a copy of 10 Practical Ways to Go Green.
Facts About Global Warming
Click here to request a copy of Facts About Global Warming.
Top 10 Reasons to Recycle
Click here to request a copy of Top 10 Reasons to Recycle.
Carbon Neutrality, Carbon Emissions and Carbon Offsets
Click here to request a copy of Carbon Neutrality, Carbon Emissions and Carbon Offsets.
Go Green at Work
Click here to request a copy of How To Go Green at Work?
Go Green at Home
Click here to request a copy of How To Go Green at Home?
The Power of the sun - Glossary of solar terms
Click here to request a copy of The Power of the sun - Glossary of solar terms.
The Carbon Lexicon - Reduction in emissions of carbon or greenhouse gases
Click here to request a copy of The Carbon Lexicon - Reduction in emissions of carbon or greenhouse gases.
Carbon Emission Stats - Per Country, Per Capita
Click here to request a copy of Carbon Emission Stats - Per Country, Per Capita.
We accept guest posts.
Link to Us Tell A Friend Subscribe to News Alerts


advertise-with-us
 

Go-Green.ae has 2,169 Green Stories, 148 Green Product Reviews, 7336 Green News Headlines , 387 Organisations in the Green Directory, 391 Green Book Reviews, 479 Green Videos, 205 Green Tips and 1711 Go Green Ambassadors in 117 countries.
Green Resources
Another Cyber Gear Site