Subscribe to Go Green News Alerts
Go Green Cyber Gear




Follow Us On Twitter    Become A Fan On Facebook    Visit Go Green Blog    Network With Us on LinkedIn    Subscribe To Our News Alerts

Go Green An Ekotribe Initiative
Read Green
Change text size:
 
 
Garbage Land: On the Secret Trail of Trash

Garbage Land: On the Secret Trail of Trash Elizabeth Royte
The v-p of a New York City waste transfer station recommends, You want to solve the garbage problem? Stop eating. Stop living. Indeed, to ponder waste disposal is to confront the very limits of our society. Where does it all go? Most of us are content to shrug off the details¬?as long as it's out of sight (and smell). Not so journalist Royte, whose book in some ways (including its title) echoes Fast Food Nation. That McDonald's is more immediately engaging a subject doesn't make, say, the massive, defunct Fresh Kills landfill on Staten Island, N.Y., any less compelling. Royte nicely balances autobiographical elements (where does her Fig Newmans carton end up, anyway?), interviews and fieldwork with more technical research. Her method yields palpable benefits, not least a wealth of vivid refuse-related slang (maggots are known as disco rice). The details unavoidably venture into the nauseating on occasion, and some might find the chemistry of trichloroethane and other toxins a bit dull. As the NIMBY logic of waste disposal forces its practitioners into secrecy, Royte is obliged to engage in some entertainingly furtive skullduggery. All in all, this is a comprehensive, readable foray into a world we'd prefer not to heed¬?but should.

Buy this book
 
Ready, Set, Green

Ready, Set, GreenGraham Hill
Ready? Set? Green! Living green means reversing climate change, but it also means protecting your kids and pets, improving your own health, and saving money. And it doesn¬?t necessarily demand a radical overhaul of your life¬?just some simple adjustments, such as switching to healthier cleaning products and driving fewer miles each week. Ready, Set, Green is the definitive (and recyclable) guide to modern green living. It offers solutions to make your home, office, car, and vacation more eco-friendly.

Including advice on how to properly insulate your house, cancel junk mail, and choose fruits and veggies wisely, Ready, Set, Green will help you change the future of the planet and restore balance to your daily life.

Buy this book
 
Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things

Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make ThingsWilliam McDonough
Paper or plastic? Neither, say William McDonough and Michael Braungart. Why settle for the least harmful alternative when we could have something that is better--say, edible grocery bags! In Cradle to Cradle, the authors present a manifesto calling for a new industrial revolution, one that would render both traditional manufacturing and traditional environmentalism obsolete. Recycling, for instance, is actually downcycling, creating hybrids of biological and technical nutrients which are then unrecoverable and unusable. The authors, an architect and a chemist, want to eliminate the concept of waste altogether, while preserving commerce and allowing for human nature. They offer several compelling examples of corporations that are not just doing less harm--they're actually doing some good for the environment and their neighborhoods, and making more money in the process. Cradle to Cradle is a refreshing change from the intractable environmental conflicts that dominate headlines. It's a handbook for 21st-century innovation and should be required reading for business hotshots and environmental activists. --Therese Littleton

Buy this book
 
The Omnivore's Dilemma

The Omnivore's DilemmaMichael Pollan
In The Omnivore's Dilemma, Michael Pollan writes about how our food is grown -- what it is, in fact, that we are eating. The book is really three in one: The first section discusses industrial farming; the second, organic food, both as big business and on a relatively small farm; and the third, what it is like to hunt and gather food for oneself. And each section culminates in a meal -- a cheeseburger and fries from McDonald's; roast chicken, vegetables and a salad from Whole Foods; and grilled chicken, corn and a chocolate soufflé (made with fresh eggs) from a sustainable farm; and, finally, mushrooms and pork, foraged from the wild.

The first section is a wake-up call for anyone who has ever been hungry. In the United States, Pollan makes clear, we're mostly fed by two things: corn and oil. We may not sit down to bowls of yummy petroleum, but almost everything we eat has used enormous amounts of fossil fuels to get to our tables. Oil products are part of the fertilizers that feed plants, the pesticides that keep insects away from them, the fuels used by the trains and trucks that transport them across the country, and the packaging in which they're wrapped. We're addicted to oil, and we really like to eat.

Buy this book
 
An Inconvenient Truth

An Inconvenient TruthAl Gore
Gore¬?s groundbreaking, battle cry of a follow-up to the bestselling Earth in the Balance¬?is being published to tie in with a documentary film of the same name. Both the book and film were inspired by a series of multimedia presentations on global warming that Gore created and delivers to groups around the world. With this book, Gore, who is one of our environmental heroes¬?and a leading expert¬?brings together leading-edge research from top scientists around the world; photographs, charts, and other illustrations; and personal anecdotes and observations to document the fast pace and wide scope of global warming. He presents, with alarming clarity and conclusiveness¬?and with humor, too¬?that the fact of global warming is not in question and that its consequences for the world we live in will be disastrous if left unchecked. This riveting new book¬?written in an accessible, entertaining style¬?will open the eyes of even the most skeptical.

Buy this book
 
Natural Capitalism

Natural CapitalismPaul Hawken
In Natural Capitalism, three top strategists show how leading-edge companies are practicing a new type of industrialism that is more efficient and profitable while saving the environment and creating jobs. Paul Hawken and Amory and Hunter Lovins write that in the next century, cars will get 200 miles per gallon without compromising safety and power, manufacturers will relentlessly recycle their products, and the world's standard of living will jump without further damaging natural resources. Is this the vision of a utopia? In fact, the changes described here could come about in the decades to come as the result of economic and technological trends already in place, the authors write.

Buy this book
 
Go to page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65
We accept guest posts.
Link to Us Subscribe to News Alerts


advertise-with-us
 

Go-Green.ae has 2,420 Green Stories, 149 Green Product Reviews, 7946 Green News Headlines , 387 Organisations in the Green Directory, 392 Green Book Reviews, 478 Green Videos, 205 Green Tips and 1755 Go Green Ambassadors in 117 countries.
Green Resources
Another Cyber Gear Site